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HIGH SPRINGS – As the November election draws closer, it won’t be long before campaign signs dot the streets of High Springs.

During the week-long qualifying period, which ended Friday, July 27, new names appeared on the candidate forms, as well as several familiar ones.

After serving one term, Mayor Dean Davis does not intend to run again. Though he doesn’t plan on remaining on the commission, Davis said he would be willing to help any time he could.

“I feel like we need to get some younger folks in there to do the job,” he said. “I think we accomplished a lot of the things that we wanted to do, but, you know, you always wish you had done a better job.”

Pat Rush will compete against former Vice-Mayor Byran Williams for Seat 4, which Davis currently occupies.

Rush has a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering and is currently employed by the University of Florida.

“The city of High Springs needs greater focus on the needs of its citizens,” he said. “The people of High Springs know what they want, but have become frustrated by the fact that their city does not respond to their interests.”

Rush hopes to rein in spending, adding that the City’s debt, lack of money and sloppy bookkeeping is inexcusable.

Williams previously served for seven years on the commission, and is the pastor at Montgomery United Methodist Church.

“I always like serving the community,” Williams said. “This is my home. I just want the best for the City of High Springs.”

If elected, Williams intends to bring economic development back into the area, as well as work to get the City moving forward again.

Vying for Seat 5, newcomer Edward Riess will run against current Commissioner Scott Jamison.

Jamison won Seat 5 in an April special election when he squared off against Ann Carter. During the April election, a total of 503 residents cast their votes to select former commissioner Eric May’s replacement after he resigned in January.  Jamison has a bachelor’s degree in Public Recreation and additional credits to teach. “When I ran the first time, one of the questions they asked at the candidates forum was if I would run again, win or lose and I said ‘yes.’ Ultimately, I’m keeping my word,” Jamison said.

Alachua County Today attempted to contact Riess, but was unable to reach him at the phone number provided to the City of High Springs.

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Email awilliamson@alachuatoday.com

HIGH SPRINGS – As the November election draws closer, it won’t be long before campaign signs dot the streets of High Springs.

During the week-long qualifying period, which ended Friday, July 27, new names appeared on the candidate forms, as well as several familiar ones.

After serving one term, Mayor Dean Davis does not intend to run again. Though he doesn’t plan on remaining on the commission, Davis said he would be willing to help any time he could.

“I feel like we need to get some younger folks in there to do the job,” he said. “I think we accomplished a lot of the things that we wanted to do, but, you know, you always wish you had done a better job.”

Pat Rush will compete against former Vice-Mayor Byran Williams for Seat 4, which Davis currently occupies.

Rush has a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering and is currently employed by the University of Florida.

“The city of High Springs needs greater focus on the needs of its citizens,” he said. “The people of High Springs know what they want, but have become frustrated by the fact that their city does not respond to their interests.”

Rush hopes to rein in spending, adding that the City’s debt, lack of money and sloppy bookkeeping is inexcusable.

Williams previously served for seven years on the commission, and is the pastor at Montgomery United Methodist Church.

“I always like serving the community,” Williams said. “This is my home. I just want the best for the City of High Springs.”

If elected, Williams intends to bring economic development back into the area, as well as work to get the City moving forward again.

Vying for Seat 5, newcomer Edward Riess will run against current Commissioner Scott Jamison.

Jamison won Seat 5 in an April special election when he squared off against Ann Carter. During the April election, a total of 503 residents cast their votes to select former commissioner Eric May’s replacement after he resigned in January.  Jamison has a bachelor’s degree in Public Recreation and additional credits to teach. “When I ran the first time, one of the questions they asked at the candidates forum was if I would run again, win or lose and I said ‘yes.’ Ultimately, I’m keeping my word,” Jamison said.

Alachua County Today attempted to contact Riess, but was unable to reach him at the phone number provided to the City of High Springs.

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