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Violations for prescription drugs and drug tests

GAINESVILLE - Political activist Charles Grapski, who is on probation for the 2007 battery of an Alachua police officer, has been arrested and charged with multiple violations of his probation.

According to the Department of Corrections Violation Report filed with the court, the first incident happened Sept. 21, 2012 when Grapski refused to submit to a random drug test.

When the probation officer called Grapski on Sept. 20 to inform him about the random drug test, Grapski became “verbally hostile” and “screamed and yelled so loudly until this officer could not speak,” according to the report. The officer noted that Grapski “was so hostile until he sounded like he was having some type of mental breakdown.” The officer eventually hung up on Grapski and transferred Grapski to a supervising officer, according to the report.

In the “Offender Statement” portion of the Violation Report, Grapski is shown to argue that he is not on probation for drug charges and should not have to be tested for drugs. He then refused to submit to a drug test until he talked to his lawyer.

University of Florida law professor Joe Little, who has represented Grapski numerous times, has since submitted a limited notice of appearance in the case.

Condition 11 of Grapski’s original Order of Probation states, “You will submit to random testing as directed by your officer or the professional staff of the treatment center where you are receiving treatment to determine the presence or use of alcohol or controlled substances.”

In addition to refusing to submit to a drug test, Grapski was arrested Sept. 23 when probation officers found Xanax and Trazadone in a box sitting on Grapski’s bed in his Osceola County home.  Xanax is a drug used to treat anxiety, and Trazadone is used in the treatment of depression.

According to the reports, Grapski claimed the pills were from previous prescriptions, but he was unable to produce the prescriptions when officers asked for them, so he was arrested and taken to the Osceola County Jail.

Due to the above incidents, Grapski’s probation officer, Earline White, wrote in the probation violation reports that, “It is the belief of this officer that the offender is not amendable to probation supervision. It is unreasonable to believe, that this offender should be permitted to remain on probation, when he cannot follow simple instructions, such as reporting when instructed and submitting to a drug test. At this point, officer safety is now an issue.”

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email editor@alachuatoday.lcom

Violations for prescription drugs and drug tests

GAINESVILLE - Political activist Charles Grapski, who is on probation for the 2007 battery of an Alachua police officer, has been arrested and charged with multiple violations of his probation.

According to the Department of Corrections Violation Report filed with the court, the first incident happened Sept. 21, 2012 when Grapski refused to submit to a random drug test.

When the probation officer called Grapski on Sept. 20 to inform him about the random drug test, Grapski became “verbally hostile” and “screamed and yelled so loudly until this officer could not speak,” according to the report. The officer noted that Grapski “was so hostile until he sounded like he was having some type of mental breakdown.” The officer eventually hung up on Grapski and transferred Grapski to a supervising officer, according to the report.

In the “Offender Statement” portion of the Violation Report, Grapski is shown to argue that he is not on probation for drug charges and should not have to be tested for drugs. He then refused to submit to a drug test until he talked to his lawyer.

University of Florida law professor Joe Little, who has represented Grapski numerous times, has since submitted a limited notice of appearance in the case.

Condition 11 of Grapski’s original Order of Probation states, “You will submit to random testing as directed by your officer or the professional staff of the treatment center where you are receiving treatment to determine the presence or use of alcohol or controlled substances.”

In addition to refusing to submit to a drug test, Grapski was arrested Sept. 23 when probation officers found Xanax and Trazadone in a box sitting on Grapski’s bed in his Osceola County home.  Xanax is a drug used to treat anxiety, and Trazadone is used in the treatment of depression.

According to the reports, Grapski claimed the pills were from previous prescriptions, but he was unable to produce the prescriptions when officers asked for them, so he was arrested and taken to the Osceola County Jail.

Due to the above incidents, Grapski’s probation officer, Earline White, wrote in the probation violation reports that, “It is the belief of this officer that the offender is not amendable to probation supervision. It is unreasonable to believe, that this offender should be permitted to remain on probation, when he cannot follow simple instructions, such as reporting when instructed and submitting to a drug test. At this point, officer safety is now an issue.”

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